Farm City

Farm CityIf you’re dreaming or simple curious about urban farming and what’s really involved, take it from a novice who’s lived through the comedy and written an engrossing memoir. Green Blizzard suggests that you either download, borrow, or buy a copy of Farm City – The Education of An Urban Farmer by Novella Carpenter.

Ms. Carpenter now has a growing portfolio of books and articles about many aspects of urban farming, corporate farming, and our diets – all delectable and entertaining.

Once the staff here at Green Blizzard got going, we couldn’t get enough of her writing.





Farm City is so engrossing that you’ll feel you’re having coffee, or more likely a drink, with a friendly neighbor who’s way over their head with a new passion and struggling to sort it out. Like many of us, she starts with small “reasonable” ambition to grow a few fruits, veggies, and manageable livestock. In a very humorous manner, every sequential growing season, this spirals more and more out of control to culminate with some mouth watering products.

Ms. Carpenter experience while inspiring, has a healthy dose of reality, something many backyard gardeners with ever-expanding dreams should hear before ordering spring planting supplies in the dead of winter.

Farm City is engrossing and you feel like you’re having coffee or more likely a drink with a friendly neighbor who’s way over their head with a new passion and struggling to sort it out. Like many of us, she starts with small “reasonable” ambition to grow a few fruits, veggies, and manageable livestock. In a very humorous manner, every sequential growing season, this spirals more and more out of control to culminate with some mouth watering products.

Another classic, be sure to include in your collection is The Essential Urban Farming, its on ours and already thumbed and worn.


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About the author

Eda North

Eda recently joined the Green Blizzard writing team and is our expert about how not to unknowingly expand your carbon footprint while gardening. With today's manicured lawn, dyed mulch, and highly fertilized gardens, our steams and waterways are choking with nitrogen and other chemical runoffs.